CC161 - WAMPIM BEADMAKING

CC161 Wampum Bead Making Elizabeth Perry 2.jpg
CC161 Wampum Bead making elizabeth Perry.jpg
CC161 Wampum Bead Making Elizabeth Perry 2.jpg
CC161 Wampum Bead making elizabeth Perry.jpg

CC161 - WAMPIM BEADMAKING

from 40.00

Learn the honored Wampanoag tradition of wampum bead and pendant making using quahog and conch shell. You’ll never walk the beach the same way again after learning the skills to transform common local shells into this beautiful art form.  With the gentle patient guidance, participants will choose their shells and learn to shape their own pieces for beads and pendants using manual, historically traditional tools and machines.  You’ll learn to use a pump drill, grinding stone and sand to shape, refine and finish your pieces.  Elizabeth will teach you the historical and cultural context within the world of wampum along with treasured stories and anecdotes of a time and people we all feel an affinity toward. 

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INSTRUCTOR BIO:

Elizabeth James Perry is a resident of Dartmouth, and an enrolled member of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head, Aquinnah, located by the richly colored clay cliffs of Martha’s Vineyard, Noepe.  As a member of a Nation that has lived on and harvested the sea since ancient times, Elizabeth’s perspective on relating to the North Atlantic is a combination of coastal Algonquian culture, traditional beliefs and contemporary Marine Science.  She is a multi-medium traditional and contemporary artist taught by her mother Patricia James-Perry and other talented and inspirational family members.  Much of Elizabeth’s work focuses on the early Native Culture of the Northeastern Woodlands, including ancient wampum shell carving and reviving natural dye techniques to create a traditional palette for her finger woven sashes, bags and baskets.  Elizabeth represents Wampanoag traditions in her writing, in her exhibit designs and occasionally through intensive community weaving and dye workshops for organizations like the Evergreen College Longhouse.  She also has a degree in Marine Science from UMass Dartmouth.

  • Tuesday, February 26, 1 - 4 p.m.

  • $25 materials fee paid to instructor at the beginning of class.

  • Limit: 8 students